Intervention Journal

July 2010 - Volume 8 - Issue 2

From the editor
Authors:
Ventevogel, Peter

ARTICLES

Stress and staff support strategies for international aid work
Authors:
Curling, Penelope; Simmons, Kathleen B.

FIELD REPORTS

Psychosocial response to the Haiti earthquake: the experiences of International Organization for Migration
Authors:
Schininà, Guglielmo; Hosn, Mazen Aboul; Ataya, Amal; Dieuveut, Kety; Salem, Marie-Adèle

REFLECTIONS, COMMENTS, LETTERS

Do victims of violence need psychodynamic treatment?
Authors:
Rabaia, Yoke; Nguyen-Gillham, Viet; Giacaman, Rita

REVIEWS

SUMMARIES

Summaries in Arabic
Authors:
Editors
Résumés en Français
Authors:
Editors
Summaries in Pashto
Authors:
Edidottors
Summaries in Russian
Authors:
Editors
Summaries in Sinhala
Authors:
Editors
Resumenes en Español
Authors:
Editors
Summaries in Tamil
Authors:
Editors

From the editor

PDF
Authors:
Ventevogel, Peter

ARTICLES

Stress and staff support strategies for international aid work

This article will explore a variety of stressors affecting humanitarian aid workers operating in an increasingly challenging environment and review structures for aid worker support. It will summarise the findings of a workplace stress survey conducted in 2009 by a large international aid organisation and provide a comparative analysis with the 2003 stress survey carried out within the same organisation. The article presents the results of respondent self evaluations relating to key sources of stress in humanitarian aid work and includes an analysis of results by sub-group, comparing staff operating in humanitarian emergencies and those working in the relative safety and security of headquarters environments, male and female, and national and international staff. Finally, the article offers a review of the effectiveness of a range of organisational staff support strategies, including a peer helper programme.

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Authors:
Curling, Penelope; Simmons, Kathleen B.

Movement, games and sport in psychosocial intervention: a critical discussion of its potential and limitations within cooperation for development

This article critically discusses the use of movement, games and sport in cooperation for development, in post conflict rehabilitation and in the context of violence, disaster and conflict. Pointing out the ambivalent nature of sport and its limitations, we conclude that, if we really want to achieve an impact through movement, games and sport, we should use them as tools with concrete strategies according to specific goals, local context and based on the interests, needs and leadership of the participants. In addition, we argue that in psychosocial intervention, sport is even more powerful combined with other movement, educational or therapeutic methods, and interventions. In spite of a few interesting evaluation and research projects, which we discuss briefly in this article, we still generally lack knowledge about the effects of the applied strategies. Nevertheless, we conclude that there are some possible key factors and basic aspects to contribute to the development of pertinent and effective projects using the potential of movement, games and sport in psychosocial interventions within cooperation for development. We also highlight the importance of the relationship with, and between, the participants and the active, dynamic and participatory character of the intervention.

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Authors:
Ley, Clemens; Barrio, María Rato

Spirituality and mental health in humanitarian contexts: an exploration based on World Vision's Haiti earthquake response

For the international nongovernemental organisation, World Vision International, the Haiti earthquake response revealed a significant gap in materials and interventions that combined spiritual needs with the mental health and psychosocial support needs of a¡ected communities. Despite growing scienti¢c evidence that spirituality can have bene¢cial e¡ects on mental health and psychosocial wellbeing, there is little guidance and consensus about psycho-spiritual approaches in humanitarian contexts.This is especially pertinent for the emergency response in Haiti where religious practice and faith underpins local culture. This can lead to practical and ethical dilemmas. Churches, the clergy and peoples’ spirituality are an important area for humanitarian practice to explore, particularly within the mental health and psychosocial support domain.

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Authors:
Schafer, Alison

Psychological support for Palestinian children and adults: an analysis of data from people referred to the Médecins Sans Frontières programme for behavioural and emotional disorders in the occupied Palestinian Territory...

Since the beginning of Al Aqsa Intifada, Palestinian children and adults living in the occupied Palestinian territory have been exposed to stressful events on a daily basis. As a result, some individuals develop severe and chronic reactive psychological syndromes. The nongovernmental organisation Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides medical and psychological support to them, using psychodynamic psychotherapy adapted to the Palestinian culture and to the low intensity conflict context. This article presents data from 1773 children and adults who received treatment by psychotherapists between November 2000 and January 2006, in the Gaza strip and the West Bank. Nearly half of the patients were children between 4 and 14 years. The three main diagnoses were a) anxiety disorder other than posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or acute stress, b) mood disorder, and c) PTSD. The psychotherapy included a median of six sessions over a period of around 11 weeks. At the evaluation at the end of therapy almost 80% of all patients had improved. These observations suggest that brief psychodynamic psychotherapy could have positive effects on the psychological wellbeing of Palestinians, even in difficult circumstances (war context) and within an Arab culture. The authors argue that this type of individual psychological support can be a useful complement to a psychosocial approach at the community level.

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Authors:
Gaboulaud, Valérie; Reynaud, Claire; Moro, Marie-Rose; Roptin, Jacky; Lachal, Christian; Brown, Vincent; Baubet, Thierry

FIELD REPORTS

Basic versus focused psychosocial interventions for community wellbeing: lessons following the Nargis cyclone interventions in Burma/Myanmar

Psychosocial interventions in Burma/Myanmar are a new phenomenon. Following the Nargis cyclone in Burma/Myanmar, assessments highlighted a clear need to address the psychosocial issues in local communities. Within the existing socio-political constraints, nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) tried to address these issues in different ways. National NGOs tried to help communities by organising community based psychosocial support programmes. This paper describes and analyses two models of psychosocial interventions. One project was purely focused on community and group interventions, while the other project had also targeted interventions for individuals and groups within a multi-layered approach. These psychosocial projects are not just an end in themselves, but form the basis for further development programmes and coordination with other actors on the ground. It is important that public health providers are involved in the service delivery process from the beginning.

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Authors:
Paratharayil, Michael

Psychosocial response to the Haiti earthquake: the experiences of International Organization for Migration

This article briefly describes the International Organization for Migration's (IOM) immediate psychosocial response to the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, and aims to substantiate some of its underlying principles. The interconnectedness of activities at the national and inter-agency coordination, direct intervention and capacity building levels are illustrated, with particular regard to the specificities of the Haitian culture, and of the pace of the overall humanitarian intervention.

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Authors:
Schininà, Guglielmo; Hosn, Mazen Aboul; Ataya, Amal; Dieuveut, Kety; Salem, Marie-Adèle

Care for the caretakers: rolling out a protocol or developing tailor-made programmes on the spot?

Some western nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) have developed protocols aimed at providing care for the caretakers. The authors, three psychosocial workers in an Asian country, show an approach that is more sensitive to the local context than any protocol could ever be. This is done by giving a detailed description of a two-day ‘stress management workshop’ that was offered to two groups of local staff members from an international NGO (INGO). By the end of the workshops, the behaviour of the participants had visibly changed: they were much less tense and more relaxed, and lethargy had been replaced by confidence in their ability to build a new future. They felt empowered by the seminar. During a follow up session three month later, it was obvious that these results had been sustained.

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Authors:
Anonymous

REFLECTIONS, COMMENTS, LETTERS

Do victims of violence need psychodynamic treatment?

PDF
Authors:
Rabaia, Yoke; Nguyen-Gillham, Viet; Giacaman, Rita

When words are not enough … psychodynamic psychotherapy in chronic conflict settings

PDF
Authors:
Prosser, Susan; Bawaneh, Ahmad

REVIEWS

Magali Chelpi-den Hamer (2010) Youngest recruits: pre-war, war and post-war experiences in Cote d’Ivoire. Amsterdam, Amsterdam: University Press

PDF
Authors:
Akello, Grace

CONFERENCE: Children and armed conflict: risk, resilience and mental health

PDF
Authors:
Song, Suzan

SUMMARIES

Summaries in Arabic

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Résumés en Français

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Summaries in Pashto

PDF
Authors:
Edidottors

Summaries in Russian

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Summaries in Sinhala

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Resumenes en Español

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Summaries in Tamil

PDF
Authors:
Editors