Intervention Journal

March 2006 - Volume 4 - Issue 1

Introduction
Authors:
van der Veer, Guus

SPECIAL SECTION

Violence with a purpose: exploring the functions and meaning of violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo
Authors:
Beneduce, Roberto; Jourdan, Luca; Raeymaekers, Timothy; Vlassenroot, Koen

ARTICLES

What can be learned from ‘crazy’ psychologists? A community approach to psychosocial support in post-conflict Guatemala
Authors:
Berliner, Peter; Dominguez, Manuel; Kjaerulf, Finn; Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima

REVIEWS

SUMMARIES

Summaries in Arabic
Authors:
Editors
Résumés en Français
Authors:
Editors
Summaries in Sinhala
Authors:
Editors
Resumenes en Español
Authors:
Editors
Summaries in Tamil
Authors:
Editors

Introduction

PDF
Authors:
van der Veer, Guus

SPECIAL SECTION

Psychosocial interventions, or integrated programming for well-being?

Over the past 25 years, humanitarian programming has increasingly included attention to the psychological and social impacts of conflict. Over this time, a wide variety of approaches have been developed to address these ‘psychosocial’ issues. The authors argue that labelling these approaches, as a distinct and separate sector of activity is not helpful, either conceptually or programmatically. They further believe close operational co-ordination is essential among the various kinds of intervention required to help any particular population affected by armed conflict to improve its psychosocial, biological and material well-being. The article includes a graphic framework that reflects the integration of safety, participation, and development within the various elements of well-being. An integrated perspective and approach is proposed that calls for inclusion of psychosocial issues within humanitarian programming, across all sectors of intervention. The significant question is not, therefore, what constitutes a ‘psychosocial intervention,’ but rather how do humanitarian interventions together promote over-all well-being. Throughout the article, points are illustrated with examples from field practice.

PDF
Authors:
Williamson, John; Robinson, Malia

Integrated programme planning and psychosocial concepts in humanitarian response: a response to Williamson and Robinson

PDF
Authors:
van Ommeren, Mark; Morris, Jodi; Saxena, Shekhar

Integrating psychosocial issues in humanitarian and development assistance: a response to Williamson and Robinson

PDF
Authors:
Ager, Alastair; Strang, Alison; Wessells, Mike

Violence with a purpose: exploring the functions and meaning of violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo

In situations of protracted armed conflict such as in sub-Saharan Africa, there exists a strong tendency to describe rebel violence as a senseless war of ‘all-against-all’. This ‘Hobbesian’ violence (a theory that people have the fundamental right to pursue selfish aims but will relinquish those rights in the interest of the common good) is often illustrated by the sight of drugged and gun-toting youths engaged in the harassment of innocent civilians. Their sole motivation appears to lay in the benefit of organized plunder. However ‘senseless’ it may appear, the violence still has its functions. It is used to foster strategies of political control, and has an important identity and social dimension. This article explores both the political and socio-psychological functions of violence in the rural areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The analysis focuses on the provinces of North and South Kivu and on Ituri, where the authors have carried out extensive field research. Their analysis will be developed in particular regard to the current demobilisation and reintegration efforts that are carried out within the scope of the ‘transition’ process in the DRC, but which so far have seen limited results. Finally, the authors will explore some alternative methods to rethink war trauma and the rehabilitation of ex-combatants in (former) conflict areas such as the DRC.

PDF
Authors:
Beneduce, Roberto; Jourdan, Luca; Raeymaekers, Timothy; Vlassenroot, Koen

ARTICLES

Bread and roses: supporting refugee women in a multicultural group

This field report describes the support and reconciliation work in a weekly multicultural and multilingual therapeutic group of African refugee women in a shelter in Johannesburg, South Africa. The problems of the participants, the therapeutic approach (which includes team building exercises, guided imaginations, story telling, drawing, modelling and discussion) as well as the impact on the participants, are all discussed.

PDF
Authors:
Ley, Katharina

Responding to the psychosocial impact of the Tsunami in a war zone: experiences from northern Sri Lanka

Three days after the Tsunami hit the war-torn Jaffna district in northern Sri Lanka, a mental health task force was formed. The approach of this task force, comprising a cooperative initiative between 18 humanitarian agencies, is described in this field report.

PDF
Authors:
van der Veen, Marianne; Somasundaram, Daya

Mental health of Afghan refugees in Pakistan: a qualitative rapid reconnaissance field study

For the past 25 years, Afghans have accounted for the greatest number of displaced persons in the world. A large proportion of this population has sought refuge in neighbouring Pakistan. Many Afghan refugees have experienced unimaginable suffering due to war and its consequences. Mental health is an essential aspect of the care of refugees, yet the mental health and well-being of Afghan refugees has not been well studied. This qualitative field survey endeavours to gain some understanding of collective factors influencing mental health in a refugee camp in Karachi, Pakistan. We present ways of expressing distress, various sources of stress, and some of the coping mechanisms utilised by the refugees in this camp. On basis of these results, some recommendations are given.

PDF
Authors:
Kassam, Azaad; Nanji, Anar

What can be learned from ‘crazy’ psychologists? A community approach to psychosocial support in post-conflict Guatemala

This article presents a community approach to supporting people affected by organised violence and torture in post-conflict Guatemala. Through an observation of a reflection group session and focus group interviews conducted with participants in a community reflection group for women, it is shown how the practical work carried out through the ODHAG – RCT (Human Rights Office of the Archbishop of Guatemala (ODHAG) and the Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims (RCT) of Denmark) programme focuses on actively building trustful social support systems and re-establish inter-personal relationships. Furthermore, it is argued that although the community approach uses health as the entry strategy, its aim is not confined to decreasing health related symptoms; in particular, the aim is the creation of social structures within the community capable of fostering social and political transformation.

Sorry, pdf file lost!

Authors:
Berliner, Peter; Dominguez, Manuel; Kjaerulf, Finn; Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima

REVIEWS

Art Therapy and Political Violence. With art, without illusion

PDF
Authors:
van der Veer, Guus

Children of Palestine: Experiencing forced migration in the Middle East

PDF
Authors:
Farrag, Mohamed; Hammad, Adnan

Speaking of War. War Rape and Domestic violence in the Former Yugoslavia; trainers about their Work for Care

PDF
Authors:
Westerveld-Sassen, Lineke

SUMMARIES

Summaries in Arabic

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Résumés en Français

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Summaries in Sinhala

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Resumenes en Español

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Summaries in Tamil

PDF
Authors:
Editors