Intervention Journal

March 2010 - Volume 8 - Issue 1

Thanks to our peer reviewers
Authors:
Editor in Chief
From the editor
Authors:
Ventevogel, Peter

ARTICLES

Including disabled children in psychosocial programmes in areas affected by armed conflict
Authors:
von der Assen, Nina; Euwema, Mathijs; Cornielje, Huib
Introducing the IASC Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Guidelines in Emergencies in Nepal: a process description
Authors:
Jordans, Mark; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Tol, Wietse; Shrestha, Parbati; Doucet, Joanne; Gurung, Radha; Aguettant, Joseph; Mahat, Pashupati; Shah, Sweta; Shrestha, Karuna Prasad; Sherchan, Surendra; Maharjan, Ramesh; Kunwar, Arun; Regmi, Ishor Raj; Shyangwa, Pramod; Melville, Amanda; van Ommeren, Mark

FIELD REPORTS

SUMMARIES

Summaries in Arabic
Authors:
Editors
Résumés en Français
Authors:
Editors
Summaries in Russian
Authors:
Editors
Summaries in Sinhala
Authors:
Editors
Resumenes en Español
Authors:
Editors
Summaries in Tamil
Authors:
Editors

Thanks to our peer reviewers

Thanks to our peer reviewers
Intervention employs a rigorous peer review process for those manuscripts that are ‘peer reviewed’.
This means, that the manuscripts deemed suitable for the peer review process are double-blind reviewed by at least 3 expert reviewers, where both the peer reviewer and the author remain anonymous to each other throughout the process. Of those peer reviewers, at least one should be an international expert in the speci¢c domain of the article, and one should be a resident in a low or middle income country. Peer reviewing is a time consuming process that requires serious dedication. Interventionwould like to thank the following experts who have peer reviewed one or moremanuscripts in the period of 2008-2009:
Abdel Hamid Afana (Occupied PalestineTerritories), Wendy Ager (US), Grace Akello (Uganda), Florence Baingana (Uganda), Judith Bass (US), Margriet Blauw (Denmark), Paul Bolton (US), Jannetta Bos (Netherlands), Martha Bragin (US), Solvig Ekblad (Sweden), Anita Everett (US), Gaithri Fernando (US), Ananda Galappatti (Sri Lanka), Arancha Garcia del Soto (US), Jane Gilbert (UK), Amber Gray (US), Ton Haans (Netherlands), Jason Hart (UK), Anne Herzberg (Norway), Rebecca Horn (UK), Mark Jordans (Nepal), Ashraf Kagee (South Africa), Itzhak Levav (Israel), Pashupati Mahat (Nepal), Anica Mikus Kos (Slovenia), Ken Miller (US), Trudy Mooren (Netherlands), Jonathan Morgan (South Africa), Suzie Morrison (Australia), Maureen Mweru (Kenya), Emmanuel Ngabirano (Uganda), Prudence Ntamutumba (Burundi), Stella Ojera (Uganda), Pau Pe¤rez-Sales (Spain), Annemiek Richters Netherlands), Miryam Rivera Holguin (Peru), Theoneste Rutayisire (Rwanda), Khalid Saeed (Pakistan), Josi Salem-Pickartz (Jordan), Bas Rijnen (Netherlands), Maleeka Salih (Sri Lanka), Rolf Schwery (Switzerland), Mohammed Shaheen (Occupied Palestine Territories), Yvonne Sliep (South Africa), Eefje Smet (Netherlands), Leslie Snider (Netherlands), Daya Somasundaram (Australia), Suzan Song (USA), Emmanuel Streel (Belgium), Suraj Thapa (Nepal), Matthias Themel (Austria), Wietse Tol (Nepal), Jean Francois Trani (India), Theodora Tsovili (Syria), Mark van Ommeren (Switzerland), Loes vanWilligen (Netherlands), Guus van der Veer (Netherlands), PeterVentevogel (Netherlands), Mike Wessells (USA), Wendy Wheaton (USA) and Tim Wind (Netherlands).

Authors:
Editor in Chief

From the editor

PDF
Authors:
Ventevogel, Peter

ARTICLES

Psychosocial research and action with survivors of political violence in Latin America: methodological considerations and implications for practice

Research with survivors of political violence in Latin America have shown that any analysis of the consequences of war or political repression should take into account the social and political realities in which the survivors are immersed. It has also shown that research must go hand in hand with action, intervention and psychosocial support for communities that confront violence. In this article, the authors review some of the basic principles that should guide research and action within the context of war or other political violence. We discuss the roles that the researcher needs to adopt in order to successfully develop work that will be of use to the social and scientific community. In addition, we describe some of the methodological implications of psychosocial research and the importance of reflective processes that could contribute to community wellbeing. The theoretical descriptions are substantiated through examples of action research in Jujuy (Argentina) with former political prisoners and relatives of detainees, or the disappeared, from the time of the last military dictatorship (1976–1983).

 

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Authors:
Martínez, Maitane Arnoso; Eiroá-Orosa, Francisco José

Tortured exiles on the streets: a research agenda and methodological challenge

The paired adversities of torture and exile form a particularly toxic combination that leaves people vulnerable to further abuse, and lacking support for recovery and integration. A descriptive study of tortured exiles living in Johannesburg explores this phenomenon in South Africa, and is presented as an example of a more widespread problem in the developing world. The authors argue that the challenges in studying this elusive group contribute greatly to its continued isolation and exclusion from care. A range of research challenges and possible solutions are discussed, including challenges relating to: sampling; the prevention of exploitation, distress and harm; interviewing challenges; language; research logistics; local laws; and care for research staff. Finally a broad research agenda is proposed in the hope that better information about tortured exiles living in the developing world will assist policy makers and service providers to build stronger and more accessible systems for the protection and support of this vulnerable group.

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Authors:
Higson-Smith, Craig; Bro, Flemming

Including disabled children in psychosocial programmes in areas affected by armed conflict

Children with disabilities are more vulnerable to violence, as well as more likely to experience psychosocial problems in situations of armed conflict than children with no disabilities. All children who live in conflict affected areas have the same rights to psychosocial support, as enshrined in the Convention on the Rights of the Child and in the case of disabled children, additionally the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. However, children with disabilities are often overlooked in psychosocial programmes. In this article, the authors examine the reasons behind this observed exclusion and suggest ways to increase the participation of children with disabilities.

 

 
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Authors:
von der Assen, Nina; Euwema, Mathijs; Cornielje, Huib

Child and adolescent mental health in Iraq: current situation and scope for promotion of child and adolescent mental health policy

Violence and instability in Iraq have had highly detrimental effects upon Iraqi children and adolescents. This article summarises the magnitude of Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) problems, and the available services in a country suffering from severe and extended conflicts, war, and international isolation. Possible interventions to promote child and adolescent mental health are discussed, including feasible CAMH policy, mental health plans and strategies. Barriers to successful implementation of CAMH services are identified and possible solutions are suggested.

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Authors:
Al-Obaidi, AbdulKareem; Budosan, Boris; Jeffrey, Linda

Introducing the IASC Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Guidelines in Emergencies in Nepal: a process description

A rich set of reflections on experiences with the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Guidelines in Emergency Settings has recently been published in this journal. This paper describes a case study of using the guidelines in Nepal, which focused primarily on detailed implementation of preparatory steps. In effect, it describes a multi-agency process of using the guidelines as a tool to raise awareness, foster coordination and systematically integrate mental health and psychosocial considerations within the humanitarian cluster approach in Nepal. It argues that these steps make it possible to further operate and actually adhere to the guidelines more feasible in future situations.

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Authors:
Jordans, Mark; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Tol, Wietse; Shrestha, Parbati; Doucet, Joanne; Gurung, Radha; Aguettant, Joseph; Mahat, Pashupati; Shah, Sweta; Shrestha, Karuna Prasad; Sherchan, Surendra; Maharjan, Ramesh; Kunwar, Arun; Regmi, Ishor Raj; Shyangwa, Pramod; Melville, Amanda; van Ommeren, Mark

FIELD REPORTS

The challenges of academic and community partnership under military occupation and the complexity of power relations

In this paper, the reader is taken on a field trip to a village in the north of the West Bank. Events described in the report are used to explore some of the methodological dimensions of a psychosocial programme designed and implemented in joint partnership between a local Palestinian academic institution, the Institute of Community and Public Health of Birzeit University, and a Palestinian nongovernmental organisation the Community Based Rehabilitation programme. In the discussion, attention is drawn to the challenges involved in conducting field research under military occupation, and the power relations entailed in collaboration between an academic institution and a partner organisation in the field, as well as with the local community.

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Authors:
Rabaia, Yoke; Gillham, Viet Nguyen

SUMMARIES

Summaries in Arabic

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Authors:
Editors

Résumés en Français

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Summaries in Russian

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Summaries in Sinhala

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Resumenes en Español

PDF
Authors:
Editors

Summaries in Tamil

PDF
Authors:
Editors