peacebuilding

Building sustainable peace through an integrated approach to peacebuilding and mental health and psychosocial support: a literature review

Abstract: The contribution of the fields of mental health and psychosocial support and peacebuilding is critical to the repair of societies affected by war and violent conflict. Despite some advances in bringing the two fields closer together, the evidence base for the outcomes and impact of an integrated approach included both mental health and psychosocial support and peacebuilding is still very thin.

Peacebuilding and psychosocial intervention: the critical need to address everyday post conflict experiences in northern Uganda

Abstract: The complex set of phenomena posed by societies affected by violence has prompted calls for integration and coordination between peacebuilding and psychosocial work. The ways in which psychosocial support interventions are implemented can contribute to, or impede, the peacebuilding process.

Introduction to Special Issue: linking mental health and psychosocial support to peacebuilding in an integrated way

Abstract: Across the world, many communities have been affected by conflict, violence and war. The impact of this suffering can vary enormously and ranges from political division to economic hardship, and from infrastructure destruction to social fragmentation. No matter which lens is used to understand how conflict affects society, human suffering remains the common denominator.

Narrowing the gap between psychosocial practice, peacebuilding and wider social change: an introduction to the Special Section in this issue

The terms ‘psychosocial interventions’ and ‘peacebuilding’ are often used as umbrella phrases. While each of these covers a widely diverging field, a primary goal of ‘psychosocial interventions’ is to improve wellbeing of individuals and families, while ‘peacebuilding’ tends to focus on communal and institutional processes.

Ships passing in the night: psychosocial programming and macro peacebuilding strategies with young men in Northern Ireland

The study presented here explores how the impact of the conflict, as it applies to interventions with young men, is conceptualised within the context of Northern Ireland after the signing of the peace agreement (1998). It focuses on four groups undertaking psychosocial work, that is, two generic support groups and two groups with an explicit focus on those who had experienced violence during the conflict.